:brexit: Brexit - The Ramifications

:brexit: Brexit - The Ramifications
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#6257

Completely agree, she seemed statemanlike and competent. Amazing it’s taken her this long to seem like either.


#6258

Errrmm…perhaps the rich bastards ain’t taking legal action over wars because maybe they are trousering loads of cash from their investments in the armaments industry maybe?

Just a thought…


#6259

Amazing, and they wonder why the world is going to rat shit…


#6260

My (self)projected profits were £4.5bn, i don’t care about the problems, give me the money.
It’s like going in a bookies and being told to pick your own odds and they’ll pay out whatever the result.
Amazing indeed.


#6261

I do not like this man

If he hates the EU so much why is he still an MEP & is happy for his kids to have a German passport despite him saying they think themselves British.


#6262

He’s an MEP for one simple reason. Becoming an MEP is easier than becomng an MP.

He is also either the least effective or most effective MEP in history, depending on which side of the debate you’re on.

The European Parliament was only ever meant to be a rubber-stamping institution, there to say yes or no to the will of the Commission. Farage turned it into a weapon against the EU.

Least effective or most effective MEP?

    • Least
    • Most

0 voters


#6263

Hmmmmmm


#6264

C’mon now. This site would be remiss as an institution if we did not point out that Farage utterly subverted the intent of the European Parliament. It was supposed to be the democratic veneer that overlaid anti-democratic practices. It ended up being his most effective vehicle for his rhetoric.


#6265

Are you saying this is a good thing?


#6266

I’m saying this is a true thing, an amusing thing and an ironic thing.

The EU Parliament was supposed to be the thing that created a veneer of legitimacy on democracy in the EU. It ended up being the place where that democratic deficit was exposed.

Is that a good thing? Probably. It probably isn’t a good thing that it took a tit like Farage to point it out.


#6267

Here’s the people that are and always were leading Brexit. All of a certain set, including Cameron and the timing was all about Maastritch(had to do something, as the 25 years was up).
They’re still very quiet aren’t they?


#6268

#6269

#6270

So what’s your thoughts on this? If voting Labour would potentially mean no Brexit deal could be done, would you still back Corbyn. For me, if Corbyn gave us the opportunity to go back, I would vote for him.


#6271

Labour not reneging on vote, news from the conference, good on them, I think they knew if they went with the Southern Labour movement on this the Northern Labour contingent would desert the party.


#6272

Do you really, really think that the EU, in their total intransigence, will say “all is forgiven, come back, we know it was all a big joke” if Article 50 was revoked (or whatever the technical term for it was)?

Don’t you think they’ll get more draconian on our arses and make us sign up fully to Schengen and the EU?


#6273

It’s the only sensible course of action if Labour wants to get elected. Personally, I think no deal is the best option for us at the minute, unless the EU makes major concessions.

It’s consistent as well. Cast your mind back to the 2017 general election and the months leading up to it. Corbyn’s Labour got pelters for voting through Article 50. Theresa May was counting on them voting it down. Her whole electoral strategy was predicated on being able to say that the Conservatives were the only party that would uphold the Brexit referendum.

If Labour had followed your suggestion of a second vote, there is no way it would have made the electoral impact that it did.

It’s also worth remembering that one party, the Liberal Democrats, did campaign on reversing the result. Sure, they got a better result than they managed in 2015, but they still have less than 20 MPs in Parliament. They were in the high fifties back in 2010.


#6274

No idea TBH, although they have always said we can go back on it. There will be a lot of pressure from industry to not do that though. I guess we may well see though.


#6275

Lib Dems are still suffering the worst hangover ever from Clegg, and then pretty mundane leadership since. I voted for them in the last election mind, based on that promise (and not bringing myself to vote for the shambles that is the current Conservatives).

Best option is reversal of Brexit, full stop, in my opinion.

The biggest issue in my eyes is if Labout got in, and then the vote was to still leave - I trust the people at Labour far less than I do the Conservatives to get this to work - and that’s saying something.


#6276

So you trust Labour less on these issues than you do the Tories?

Can I ask why? What competence have the Conservatives shown in their handling of the issue to date? Why, they’re the people that are the reason we had the referendum in the first place, aren’t they?

Let’s not pretend that was for the good of the people or even Conservative members. The only reason that the option was on the table was because Cameron wanted if off the table for another forty years until forever.

Let’s not forget that the current crop of Conservatives have shifted position more often than a bare-arsed bloke sitting on broken glass. They chose a Remainer PM, who swiftly pilfered UKIP’s 2015 policy positions before conjuring an outcome they couldn’t even sell to their own Brexit minister.

What’s this trust based on? Blind faith and an expectation that despite all indications to date, the incumbents are going to get this to work now?

Seems pretty flimsy, dude.