:brexit: Brexit - Deal or no deal

#21

Here is a big fat wriggly worm dangled out by the EU

This has pretty much fucked Mays Deal (if it wasnt already fucked) The Remain Mps are going to grab this with both hands

#22
#23

Haha what a dumbass :lou_smiley:

#24

A good read. It doesn’t pick a side it looks at the wider reasons behind and the fractures in society.

#25

As I have always said, the South is a different Country to the North, years of being taken for granted and here we are, its two different Labour parties.
This was the Norths chance and they took it right or wrong, London is in a bubble, a total and utter bubble.
It isn’t England nor the UK (its my my favourite City by the way) by a long way, many voted for many different reasons but some won’t lose whatever as they have nothing already.
As for being ashamed to be English, this happened after the war as the Empire was broken up, by design really and the liberals love it, we are the least patriotic nation on the planet and only abroad do we feel more comfortable about being English.
Us English will celebrate being a smattering of being something else but heaven forbid celebrating being English.

#26

If Labour support a new vote or in anyway supports a no Brexit action they’ll be wiped out up here in the main and they’ll be responsible for a genuine reactionary right wing party taking hold and having real influence in chambers of power.

#27

Vote cancelled. May tried to call round EU Leaders to g et concessions and got nothing.

Basically PANIC

#28

The pound is continuing to lose ground, as traders prepare to hear from Theresa May this afternoon.

Sterling is now down a whole eurocent against the euro at €1.1078, the lowest since September. That means the euro is worth more than 90p.

Against the US dollar, sterling has just scraped a new 18-month low, down almost one cent at $1.264.

Jaws have been dropping across the City in the last few hours. Banks, stock brokers and foreign exchange firms had all drawn up plans for a big night on Tuesday, as the Meaningful Vote took place.

Hotels were booked, caterers arranged, as traders prepared for a big all-nighter.

Now, investors are watching Westminster to see how the saga develops.

Here’s how Brad Bechtel of investment bank Jefferies summed up the situation to clients:

The risk of a disastrous vote scenario was too high and therefore they felt it prudent to delay for now. Don’t honestly know if that is a good or bad thing.

Either the vote was going to be so bad that postponing it is a good thing, or the postponement of the vote tells you how far away from a good scenario they are.

#29


#30

So after two years of the Tory Party negotiating with the EU, with this farcical outcome, in your world Labour will be responsible for the chaos that will be visited on this country as a result? Intellectual pygmyism at it’s finest. Socialist my arse Barry. You are a right wing reactionary Tory in sheep’s clothing.

1 Like
#31

You know nothing Nottarf Krap…

#32

Lack of content duly noted.

#33

If Labour stalls its betrays its heartlands, 67% of the nations constituencies voted leave, I don’t expect you to understand, and I wrote that as a mock up of GOT, you truly struggle.

#34

I agree with you on this. There are too many Labour MPs that have already forgotten the Gillian Duffy episode, and seem to be practising it writ large with Brexit voters.

The urban centres will always stay Labour of course. The problem is all the other constituencies they need to win to gain power.

One thing I would say is that Labour’s plan for a customs union is a nice bit of 4D Chess. The leadership know that the EU won’t play ball. It’ll give them the agency they need to make the best of a post-EU Britain.

#35

On that very note, watching Barclay get questioned by the House. Right wing Labour MP after right wing Labour MP is asking if we can revoke Article 50. Lovely ammunition for the Tories, already capitalising on it.

#36

Southerners don’t understand, I don’t expect them to as they don’t live in the North, we are two different parties but a broad church, its always been that way, Islington and Burnley but Brexit could split the party, it really could.

#37

Is Dennis Skinner right wing?

#38

You do realise Southampton voted 53.8% to leave, right?

I don’t expect you to because you take no positive interest in it.

#39

I did but were they Labour voters? I don’t understand your point. Southampton is 1/3 Labour nowadays.

#40

That’s a bit of a simplification, Bazza.

It would be two out of two if the Flower Estates hadn’t been gerrymandered in with Romsey.

Interestingly, the former Southampton Itchen MP, John Denham, actually chimes with your views. Bit more eloquently like.