💩 This is a shit idea

:poop: This is a shit idea
0

#21

Originally posted by @PhilippineSaint

Isnt that what every war film ever made has done Pap?

Not really. You could hardly call “Come and see” or “Cross of Iron” as adverts for war, nor could you have called any of the recent WWI films I’ve seen an ad for war either - Passchendaele and Beneath Hill 60 spring to mind.

It’s particularly offensive in game form because it completely cheapens the concept of human life, which the real life conflict did a fuckload of anyway. “Hey kids, go over the top! You’ll respawn if you die!”. If only soldiers back then had that option.

The Somme was the worst day in British military history for a reason. Probably not to make dosh for entertainment companies a century later.


#22

I can see where you are coming from with this Pap but regardless of the content war films are made to make money and in any war film somebody will lose whether it be the good guys or the bad guys. If you are wanting to censor games you will also start with the other entertainment industries.


#23

Who’s speaking about censorship? Not me.

It’ll work as everything else does. They’re free to release it. I’m free to point out that it’s a load of tawdry old shite.


#24

This isn’t a shit idea, it’s a pretty contemptible idea.

guys auctions gun used to kill a 17 year old boy


#25

“Hey UK artists! We’re Sainsburys. You may know us from being Britain’s second largest supermarket chain and being fucking minted. Would you like to spruce up one of our canteens so our wage slaves feel slightly less suicidal when they take their breaks? For free?”


#26

Gotta love the information age.

Content is king - but fuck paying content creators!


#27

Jesus christ this is a shite idea, also 'kin terrifying.

Facial Recognition App

Face recognition app taking Russia by storm may bring end to public anonymity

FindFace compares photos to profile pictures on social network Vkontakte and works out identities with 70% reliability

If the founders of a new face recognition app get their way, anonymity in public could soon be a thing of the past. FindFace, launched two months ago and currently taking Russia by storm, allows users to photograph people in a crowd and work out their identities, with 70% reliability.

It works by comparing photographs to profile pictures on Vkontakte, a social network popular in Russia and the former Soviet Union, with more than 200 million accounts. In future, the designers imagine a world where people walking past you on the street could find your social network profile by sneaking a photograph of you, and shops, advertisers and the police could pick your face out of crowds and track you down via social networks.

In the short time since the launch, Findface has amassed 500,000 users and processed nearly 3m searches, according to its founders, 26-year-old Artem Kukharenko, and 29-year-old Alexander Kabakov.

Kabakov says the app could revolutionise dating: “If you see someone you like, you can photograph them, find their identity, and then send them a friend request.” The interaction doesn’t always have to involve the rather creepy opening gambit of clandestine street photography, he added: “It also looks for similar people. So you could just upload a photo of a movie star you like, or your ex, and then find 10 girls who look similar to her and send them messages.”

^^^Holy shit how creepy is this?!


#28

Eric Blair was spot on apart from he thought it would have happened sooner


#29

In fairness to, the often maligned, LinkedIn - I am fairly sure this was the result of an accident/poor planning, as opposed to intentionally malicious thinking.

But, seriously :lou_facepalm_2:

LinkedIn tells users connection he is a White Supremacist

LinkedIn Called Me a White Supremacist

And all I did was happen to share a name with one.

On the morning of May 12, LinkedIn, the networking site devoted to making professionals “more productive and successful,” emailed scores of my contacts and told them I’m a professional racist. It was one of those updates that LinkedIn regularly sends its users, algorithmically assembled missives about their connections’ appearances in the media. This one had the innocent-sounding subject, “News About William Johnson,” but once my connections clicked in, they saw a small photo of my grinning face, right above the headline “Trump put white nationalist on list of delegates.”

This surely caused a few of my professional acquaintances to spit-take. I’m a middle-school teacher in New York City. I am not a white nationalist, nor have I been on the list of delegates for Donald Trump’s presidential campaign. But I share a name with someone who can claim those two traits.

I emailed LinkedIn and requested that the company somehow issue a correction to my connections, making it clear that I’m not, in fact, the William Johnson who hasproposed revoking the citizenship of and deporting all people of color living in the United States. My email included the words libel and attorney, so I hoped for a quick response. It was 8:44 a.m. I had to go teach my eighth-graders.

Two hours later, LinkedIn had yet to respond, so I sent another note. At this point, I’d received a bunch of messages from confused connections. It turns out that when LinkedIn sends these update emails, people actually read them. So I was getting upset. Not only am I not a Nazi, I’m a Jewish socialist with family members who were imprisoned in concentration camps during World War II. Why was LinkedIn trolling me?


#30

Originally posted by @KRG

In fairness to, the often maligned, LinkedIn - I am fairly sure this was the result of an accident/poor planning, as opposed to intentionally malicious thinking.

But, seriously :lou_facepalm_2:

LinkedIn tells users connection he is a White Supremacist

LinkedIn Called Me a White Supremacist

And all I did was happen to share a name with one.

On the morning of May 12, LinkedIn, the networking site devoted to making professionals “more productive and successful,” emailed scores of my contacts and told them I’m a professional racist. It was one of those updates that LinkedIn regularly sends its users, algorithmically assembled missives about their connections’ appearances in the media. This one had the innocent-sounding subject, “News About William Johnson,” but once my connections clicked in, they saw a small photo of my grinning face, right above the headline “Trump put white nationalist on list of delegates.”

This surely caused a few of my professional acquaintances to spit-take. I’m a middle-school teacher in New York City. I am not a white nationalist, nor have I been on the list of delegates for Donald Trump’s presidential campaign. But I share a name with someone who can claim those two traits.

I emailed LinkedIn and requested that the company somehow issue a correction to my connections, making it clear that I’m not, in fact, the William Johnson who hasproposed revoking the citizenship of and deporting all people of color living in the United States. My email included the words libel and attorney, so I hoped for a quick response. It was 8:44 a.m. I had to go teach my eighth-graders.

Two hours later, LinkedIn had yet to respond, so I sent another note. At this point, I’d received a bunch of messages from confused connections. It turns out that when LinkedIn sends these update emails, people actually read them. So I was getting upset. Not only am I not a Nazi, I’m a Jewish socialist with family members who were imprisoned in concentration camps during World War II. Why was LinkedIn trolling me?

Wow, the perils of LinkedIn’s algorithm-driven everything. While not intentional, I am not sure you can just put this down to an accident - this is how their whole business works. I attended a course a while back about how to get the most out of your LinkedIn profile, from someone who clearly knew a shit load about how the whole set up works. Lots of very useful stuff came out about the pitfalls and the problems of not knowing how and where they use word searches, how they rank individuals and profiles and how they drive 80% of their revenue from recruiters. Beware the unwary indeed, but clearly this guy above has been particulary screwed over.


#31

Alan Sugar being made an enterprise tsar again.


#32

The surprise track at the end of a CD. What is the point of it FFS? First time, yes, fun idea. But people keep doing it and it is really, really irritating. There is a track on the last Alt J album that comes on about 10 mins after you think the CD has finished. If you jump a track it just takes you back to number 1 again so the only way to hear the “surprise” track is to go and have a cup of tea and a sandwich and come back 10 minutes later! What is the point? Arghhhhh.

FFS!


#33

Booking players for taking their shirts off when celebrating a goal. They are not kicking anyone. They are not head butting anyone. They are not punching anyone. They are not spitting at anyone. All they are doing is expressing a moment of pure joy.

Stop it. Stop it now.


#34

Although it is a shit idea was this not brought in so that the advertisers on the shirts had the paid for logo shown on the screen instead of a slogan written on a shirt underneath the official one?

If they just put a fine in place instead of the yellow card commiserate with the players actual wages this may curb the habit.


#35

Bah, you’re moaning about free songs?

Especially when you can count this among their number.


#36

how is it a free song unless you steal the album?


#37

Because it’s not listed in the manifest.

It’s like when you order a huge takeaway and they give you free onion bhaji because they want repeat tubster business,


#38

it’s not free… You paid for the album. I don’t want to fall out with you but you’re wrong and should apologise.


#39

Indeed. If they want to give us a “free” song, great. In that case just put it on after the last track and leave it off of the track listing. My issue is that there is a long wait before you get to it and if you hit the skip button to try and find it without waiting 5 minutes it takes you back to track 1 - so you have to sit and wait for it.

And as Fatso says, you pay for the album so really you have paid for everything on it, listed or not.

I dont think they are called “free” tracks. I think they call them hidden tracks. Why hide them? They arent easter eggs.


#40

excellent point about Easter eggs, SOG. If they want to give a free song, it should be supplied separately and involve you not paying anything (ie free).

I’m not fussed about hidden tracks. What I object to are pap’s lies.