Should Faith Schools be banned?

Should Faith Schools be banned?
0

#1

In the modern era what purpose do they actually serve?
How much subsidy does the taxpayer give and should we give any at all?
State or Faith, should they be separate? I believe so.


#2

yes


#3

Does your kid go to a denominational school, Bazza?

Most schools in Liverpool are run by the Catholic Church or the CofE. My kids have gone through the Catholic School system.


#4

Personally I think that religion should be kept out of schools. If parents or children want to learn about faith they should do so outside of the academic system. I have agreed with Barry. Is this the start of the slippery slope?


#5

She isn’t old enough yet to, totally against them, Liverpool has a massive sectarianism/education issue, its the only English City to celebrate the 12th July.

We are buggered here so it will have to be CofE I suspect, they are more Renlgish than religious or the least religious of all faiths.


#6

Having spent many an unhappy hour at a Catholic school many years ago I would’ve welcomed a ban.


#7

Send them back up the chimneys the lazy little shits. Find a pokemon up there you little fucker.


#8

Never trust the church


#9

Just instruct them in the works of the Dark One when they get home.

Balance.


#10

Ban em, disgusting that my taxes go towards supporting schools which can then turn around and exclude my son because we don’t follow their particular brand of ideology. We were lucky that the council in Brighton opened a new state school in our area just as he was starting, otherwise it would have been an hour round trip to the next nearest one as all the others in our immediate vicinity are faith schools.


#11

As a teacher I’ve always been against faith schools and the same as a parent. I would never work in one after doing so as a student teacher 20+ years ago and opted not to send my kids to one even though it was the closest to us.

A headteacher, jock, catholic that I know, and have worked with in Brum, described them as “The Catholic Mafia”.

There should be a total seperation between church and state in educational matters and if you want your kids to be taught in a CofE/Catholic/Jewish/Sikh/Hindu/Muslim school you should pay for it yourself.


#12

Originally posted by @Flahute

A headteacher, jock, catholic that I know, and have worked with in Brum, described them as “The Catholic Mafia”.

Problem there of course is that the Mafia is already Catholic. Maybe the Catholic Cartel would be a better name, to preserve the distinction. Give ur mate a call, see what he thinks.


#13

Pretending you give a fk about God is the bedrock of our society, and a trial that all men must endure, sooner or later.


#14

Your Mum and Dad should never have sent you to a convent.


#15

My kids went / go to CofE primary and secondary schools. Very little in the way of god-bothering apart from the obligatory Xmas and Easter visit from the vicar.

Both are doing well and not religious in the slightest. Most faith groups are well represented and the pupils all mix well & are not hung up on religious issues in the media or elsewhere - well that’s my perception, but it might be different when they get home, but that’s down to the parents, not the kids.

So, from my experience faith schools don’t all have to be bad.


#16

So what’s the point then?


#17

Our experience of sending the kids to Catholic School basically involved paying a levy each year, the communions and the confirmations. Communions were actually a good laugh. People just use them as an excuse to get pissed.

Both of my girls actually chose to do their confirmations, but aren’t church-goers.


#18

I got confirmated. They made me say all sorts of stuff bout how much i loved God 4eva, but I had my fingers crossed the whole time. I just wanted to go to the church youth club cos my mate said there was hot girls there, but that turned out to be fkn lies so Jokes On Me.

Edit: I had to have interview with vicar before I got confirmated, and I made up all sorts of bollocks that i thought he would want to hear, cos it felt like a test, and I like passing tests, and then on my confirmation day he stood up in church in front of everyone and said something along lines of, “James is a very impressive and earnest young man, he confessed to me that the gravity of his commitment to God has been weighing him down, and he looks forward to this day as a release and a celebration of his Love. He expressed a hope that one day he might take the cloth himself, and considers his confirmation the first step towards that heartfelt goal.”

My mum was giving me some v.funny looks while he was rattling all that off. It was v.embarrassing.


#19

Thanks to Cobham for his real world view.

Faith schools usually have high standards of education and achieve very good results FWIW before anyone decides they should be banned.


#20

all my schooling was Catholic and they were by far the most sought after schools. Always seemed to have more money than any other. Always had great facilities and this was when Thatcher was decimating the country.

Religion didn’t really play a big part(kids don’t generally give a shit).

All that said, I agree with Wan Ton’s point of view.