One year since the funniest night in history

One year since the funniest night in history
0

#1

A whole year has passed since The Donald bantered his way to becoming the most powerful man in the World.

Being unemployed, I spent the night wanking, drinking whiskey, refreshing 4chan and laughing my tits off at the collective panic and horror that set in (as well as trying to win back the £200 I gambled on Hillary winning by a country mile)

Where were you that fateful night?


#2

I was fucking bricking it mate! The idea that someone so evidently evil, dangerous and completely unqualified for the job could basically buy their way to power on the back of big business and nepotism was fkn terrifying to me!

Fortunately, Hillary lost.


#3

Hey @mrtrampoline how is the job going?


#4

I didn’t start sadly as I’ve been very ill and in hospital. Mental illness is always fun. :lou_wink_2:

Doing alright now though - they’ve deferred my start date to the new year which was cool of them. Just kinda chilling at home and hitting the gym every day at the moment. So no job but I’m looking fucking pretty as fuck! The Trampoline always bounces back!


#5

Sorry to hear that, hope you are on the mend.


#6

In bed. Asleep. Time Zones.

HTH

:lou_eyes_to_sky:

Keep working out ready to go out working MrT


#7

Cheers lads. I’m very fortunate indeed to be alive and have been hanging out at a cafe for people with mental health issues down in Tooting so I’ve been very lucky to have a good community around me as well as a group of friends who were willing to visit me etc. I’ve met people who’ve been through some of the most unimaginable difficulties and some who are sadly no longer with us so I’m very grateful for what I have. On the other side of the coin I’ve met some people who are hugely inspiring and somehow manage to strengthen those around them despite what they have to go through. All joking aside my political beliefs were genuinely changing before all this but much as things like Trump getting elected are morbidly hilarious don’t worry - I know that deep down there have to be more structures in place to help the poorest and most needy and there really is only so much you can do through private charity.

At my worst back in early Sept. I was on propanalol, diazepam, zopiclone and sertraline - now I’m just on the sertraline and have managed to wean off the others so I’m definitely on the mend.


#8

Not trying to trivialise what you’ve been(/are going) through, but this only serves to strengthen my position we are in many ways mirror versions of each other. Sounds like, again, we’ve had some similar experiences here.

Sincerely though, glad to hear you are doing better and sounds like you’ve got a good network around you.


#9

I’m quite interest in the cafe for people with mental health issues. Do you need like a doctor’s certificate? There’s a cafe near me for “People of above average intelligence maybe not academically but at least street smarts” but i think that is more a Marketing thing than a genuine support group. It’s fkn packed.


#10

Franchise opportunity for someone with a catering background @bearsy


#11

Nah you can literally just pop down and chat to people. Its a mix of volunteers and professional people working in care. They’ve got yoga, art therapy, board games and so on. Great people.

I’m thinking of writing a blog about all this - some of the characters you meet there are awesome. I met a guy from the Congo with anxiety issues who was recently made homeless (I gave him my number and offered him an old sleeping bag but it sounds like he’s found himself a doss house in Croydon), I know a guy who has 2 PHDs and used to earn £180k as a structural engineer but had his life fall apart after a divorce (he already had Bipolar disorder and his wife basically took everything and left him homeless). I know a wonderful posh-voiced black lady in her fifties who’s become a genuinely dear friend of mine from the moment I asked her her diagnosis and she confidently said “I’m psychotic dahling”. There’s this French/Iraqi rasta guy who’s super chilled, into literature, philosophy and music and so on - I asked him what his diagnosis was and he put his arms behind his dreadlocked head, smiled with a click of the tongue and laughingly said “schizophrenia bro”. I know a guy who appears totally normal but (poor sod - can’t deny its kinda funny) - he believes Morrissey is secretly communicating to him through coded messages in his songs and that its somehow connected with God and whatnot.

Great people.

The great thing about the cafe is that (aside from taking the heat off A&E) it gives you a community where the stigma is completely gone. Now that I’m better I try and do my bit by hanging around and being a half decent listener. I may well start volunteering and helping out with the cooking and shit in the next few weeks.


#12

Woud be genuinely interested to read it, if you do.

Sounds like a really good initiative.


#13

Good setting for a sitcom also


#14

Sounds like you have had a tough time Mr T. Can’t believe you were on so many meds! I was only on one at at time so feel I have missed out! Good that you have plenty of support. I spent some time in one of The Priorys in 2004 and met some great people there from all walks of life. Mental issues, like cancer and all the other crap ailments can strike anyone at anytime. Hang in there matey. It is so good that you can talk about it. It used to be such a taboo subject but it is something that so many people suffer with and the more we talk about it the more the stigma goes away. Sounds like you are coping well and heading out of the darkness. All the best to you!


#15

Indeed the line " he was a structural enginer but his life fell apart" made me laugh, I probably shouldn’t have but, as PigBag once said, you have to laugh or else you cry.


#16

I meant the election night would be good setting for a sitcom! Not Mental Illness Cafe, you sick bastard.


#17

Sorry @bearsy , I’m glad to see your caring side come to the fore now that you’re expecting…


#18

Nah you can literally just pop down and chat to people. Its a mix of volunteers and professional people working in care. They’ve got yoga, art therapy, board games and so on. Great people.

I’m thinking of writing a blog about all this - some of the characters you meet there are awesome. I met a guy from the Congo with anxiety issues who was recently made homeless (I gave him my number and offered him an old sleeping bag but it sounds like he’s found himself a doss house in Croydon), I know a guy who has 2 PHDs and used to earn £180k as a structural engineer but had his life fall apart after a divorce (he already had Bipolar disorder and his wife basically took everything and left him homeless). I know a wonderful posh-voiced black lady in her fifties who’s become a genuinely dear friend of mine from the moment I asked her her diagnosis and she confidently said “I’m psychotic dahling”. There’s this French/Iraqi rasta guy who’s super chilled, into literature, philosophy and music and so on - I asked him what his diagnosis was and he put his arms behind his dreadlocked head, smiled with a click of the tongue and laughingly said “schizophrenia bro”. I know a guy who appears totally normal but (poor sod - can’t deny its kinda funny) - he believes Morrissey is secretly communicating to him through coded messages in his songs and that its somehow connected with God and whatnot.

Great people.

The great thing about the cafe is that (aside from taking the heat off A&E) it gives you a community where the stigma is completely gone. Now that I’m better I try and do my bit by hanging around and being a half decent listener. I may well start volunteering and helping out with the cooking and shit in the next few weeks.

This all sounds very similar to a place that I pop into from time to time

Well, apart from the yoga

… which hopefully the Soviet will introduce in the near future.

Glad to know you’re feeling better, Tramps. All the best to you.


#19

Nobody really believed me when I was struggling with the mental side of things - so I ran away to Australia (true story - although it wasn’t exactly a spontaneous thing as getting through the emigration process as an almost broke 40-something isn’t exactly straightforward!). Running away doesn’t often help, but in this instance it did. It’s amazing what opportunities life coughs up when you are most in need. I emigrated 14 years ago this week, and today I am celebrating my 10th wedding anniversary to the most amazing woman. :slight_smile:


#20

Going to this talky thing tonight. Should be interesting.