Have a word with yourself?

The Mirror has an article about people that talk to themselves.

Talking to yourself out loud is not a sign of madness but could indicate a high level of intelligence, a study revealed.

Those who speak to themselves while focusing on a task do better than those who stay quiet, experts at Bangor University found.

Psychologists at the university gave 28 people a set of written instructions and asked them to read them either silently or out loud before measuring their concentration and performance.

They found when people read instructions out loud, their brains absord more of the material than if they only use their inner dialogue.

Have done so myself throughout my professonal programming life. Helps slow thinking down, which helps write programs.

Do you have a word with yourself?

http://www.mirror.co.uk/news/uk-news/talking-yourself-out-loud-helps-10363142

Yep, I find it’s the only way I can listen to someone talking sense.

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Must not talk about the voices. Must not talk about the voices. Must…

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Jeez the noisiest thread on Sotonians!

STFU!

I want to know if the researchers talked to themselves and whether this is a factor in doing the research and conclusion.

I talk to myself sometimes but I rarely listen

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I talk to inanimate objects (namely photocopiers, golf clubs etc) like they were a person sometimes, usually when something is going wrong and I want something to blame. Does that count?

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My other self posts on here sometimes. I never respond

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I talk and row with myself all the time and I always win.

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Grind yourself down do ya Baz ?

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Forest Freshers Week Alert Steve!

I hear voices in my head all the time.

So do I.

Me too.

And me.

Your mother sucks cocks in hell!

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I watched this last night and found it fascinating.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/iplayer/episode/b08pltgy/horizon-2017-why-did-i-go-mad

What was most interesting to me was that 3 of the people featured, who you would describe as schizophrenics, each held down jobs - some in very responsible roles.

That said, one of the people they followed - David from Winchester (Oxford-educated PhD.) struggles with voices and hallucinations. He was filmed sitting in the Wykeham arms talking to a therapist when he stopped mid-sentence and stared at an empty chair in abject terror. It turned out that he could see an 18-inch lobster-type monster (clue - it wasn’t there) - a common theme in his hallucinations.

Some of those studied ‘befriend’ their voices; turning them from malevolent forces that bid them evil, into kindly ‘friends’ that look out for them and their needs. We see one woman thank one of the (one hundred) voices in her head for reminding her to leave her daughter some dinner money. Lol. She then went to work and gave a lecture to 50 people before jetting off to direct some event in the US.

The ‘cause’ of these psychotic episodes isn’t always clear but a common link is a deficit of Dopamine in the brain. Abuse early in life was also a common factor for the people they spoke to. These voices are often just trying to steer the host away from danger.

It’s amazing that these people, that I feel so grateful to be so distant from, are exactly the same as me but with a deficit of a specific chemical.

Life’s a lottery, eh?

I’m also currently reading The man who Mistook his Wife for a hat by Oliver Sacks and I am really enjoying it. Sacks wrote the book Awakenings upon which the Robin Williams film was based, and again L-Dopa (forms Dopamine) was the trigger for dormant patients to (temporarily) come back to ‘life’.

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I have been having arguments with the female sat nav voice in my car, she keeps saying turning around now! We’ve been to counselling and I think it’ll work out

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except for the fact that I’ve been knobbing her for a month

That explains the dirty dashboard :slight_frown:

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Hey Saintbletch,

I watched this last night and found it fascinating.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/iplayer/episode/b08pltgy/horizon-2017-why-did-i-go-mad

What was most interesting to me was that 3 of the people featured, who you would describe as blacks, each held down jobs - some in very responsible roles.

That said, one of the people they followed - David from Winchester (Oxford-educated PhD.) struggles with voices and hallucinations. He was filmed sitting in the Wykeham arms talking to a therapist when he stopped mid-sentence and stared at an empty chair in abject terror. It turned out that he could see an 18-inch lobster-type monster (clue - it wasn’t there) - a common theme in his hallucinations.

Some of those studied ‘befriend’ their voices; turning them from malevolent forces that bid them evil, into kindly ‘friends’ that look out for them and their needs. We see one woman thank one of the (one hundred) voices in her head for reminding her to leave her daughter some dinner money. Lol. She then went to work and gave a lecture to 50 people before jetting off to direct some event in the US.

The ‘cause’ of these psychotic episodes isn’t always clear but a common link is a deficit of Dopamine in the brain. Abuse early in life was also a common factor for the people they spoke to. These voices are often just trying to steer the host away from danger.

It’s amazing that these people, that I feel so grateful to be so distant from, are exactly the same as me but with a deficit of a specific chemical.

Life’s a lottery, eh?

I’m also currently reading The man who Mistook his Wife for a hat by Oliver Sacks and I am really enjoying it. Sacks wrote the book Awakenings upon which the Robin Williams film was based, and again L-Dopa (forms Dopamine) was the trigger for dormant patients to (temporarily) come back to ‘life’.

Just a new spin :laughing:

BARRY SANCHEZ …“SEE … BARRY WAS RIGHT ALL ALONG”

BARRYinthemirror …" I WAS SAYING IT FOR AGES BEFORE THAT"

BARRY SANCHEZ … “BLAH BLAH BLAH !!”

BARRYinthemirror …“BLAH BLAH BLAH BLAH !!”

BARRY SANCHEZ …“BLAH BLAH BLAH BLAH BLAH BLAH BLAH BLAH !!”

BARRYinthemirror … [mutter] “fuckin’ woppa” !!

BARRY SANCHEZ … [low mutter] … “I said it first tho’”… [exit sharply]

I see what you’ve done, Ted, but I’m not sure why you did it.

I can guess, but can’t quite make the leap.

Can you help me out?